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Debbie Meiliken


A home is not a home because of its room dimensions or the color of the walls. It is about how you feel when you walk through the front door. And the way you can instantly envision your life unfolding there.
Phone: 914-500-9198
Office: 120 Bloomingdale Road, Suite 101, White Plains, NY 10605

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10 Secrets to Optimizing Your Credit Score

Insider Secrets To An Optimal Credit Score

by KCM

As you prepare to apply for credit (like a home mortgage) understand that it is significantly better to have your best possible credit profile BEFORE applying.  Working to improve your score during the mortgage process can be done, but there are two problems.  One, time to clear up items can become an obstacle when compared the time you are anticipating a closing.  And two, lower scores upfront can give an underwriter an additional reason to be uncomfortable with a file.  “Sooner, rather than later” should be the mantra of credit score improvements.  Here are some tested ways to do it:

Credit Cards – Revolving Debt proportions

  1. Look on the credit report for revolving debt (not installment loans, or “open” accounts)
  2. As a general rule of thumb, the balance should be no more than 30% of the credit limit.  So, if it’s more than that, have you should make every attempt to pay it down.
  3. If there are many revolving accounts with high balances, you will most probably need to pay down most or all of them for the best score.
  4. If there is nothing derogatory on the credit report, just high balances on revolving debt, you can often improve the score significantly.  But, if there are many derogatory items on the credit report, paying down revolving debt may not help the score very much.
  5. Many lender have software programs that can quickly determining for you which (if any) revolving accounts need to be paid down, and to what balance.

Collections/Judgments:

  1. Paying off or satisfying such a derogatory account does not normally improve the score because the derogatory account still exists, and so still hurts the score.  In fact, paying off an old collection may even make the score drop.
  2. However, for collections, the borrower can ask for the account to be completely removed or deleted.  If you have not yet paid the collection, you can use that as a bargaining chip.
  3. If there are many collection accounts, removing just 1 or 2 may not do much good.  You always need to look at the overall credit picture.
  4. Charge-off accounts behave a little differently than collections.  You can sometimes gain points by paying those off.
  5. Your lender likely has a What-if Simulator to experimentally see what affect removing an account has on the score.


Late Dates

  1. When you look at the overall credit report and you see LOTS of late dates, especially ones from within the last year, there is not much you can do to help the score…those lates simply need to drift into the past.
  2. However, if you just see 1 recent late date on 1 account, and just 1 other recent late date on another account, you should call those creditors and ask…beg…for those single late dates to be removed as a courtesy.  It may also be that the late dates were a mistake, but don’t push the creditor to admit to making an error.  Just ask them to remove it as a courtesy since you have an otherwise perfect payment history with that creditor.
  3. Your lender can use the What-if-Simulator to experimentally see what affect removing a late date has on the score.

Authorized User Accounts-removing or adding

  1. Piggybacking on someone else’s account can help or hurt your score.
  2. If that account has recent late dates, you can most probably improve the score by having the actual account holder remove you as a user.
  3. If the account is a revolving credit card and it’s “maxed out,” you might also improve the score by removing it, but only if you will still have other revolving credit cards on your report.
  4. What about adding someone as an authorized user to a credit card?  This may help, but the better course of action is to get the actual card holder to make it a joint account with you.  This guarantees that the account will show up on the credit report within a month or two.  But be careful…the account should have a lot of history, no late dates, high credit limit, and low balance.

Other things to help

  1. Keep old revolving credit cards open…don’t close them.
  2. Regularly check your credit report to catch errors early.  You get a free one each year from each bureau.  Go to www.annualcreditreport.com.  Don’t do all 3 bureaus at the same time…space it out throughout the year.
  3. Learn more about credit from websites like www.myfico.com and to get addresses to write the bureaus.

While I trust that some of your questions were answered in this blog, I bet many questions were also raised about your individual circumstance.  Credit Score Optimization is one of the central reasons why you should engage the expertise of a good loan officer right NOW.

Interest rates are already on the rise and home sales are picking up, so take advantage now, while it’s still a buyer’s market and interest rates are still close to their record lows. Let us help you in throughout Westchester: Scarsdale, New Rochelle, Larchmont, Edgemont, Pelham, White Plains, Harrison, Mamaroneck, Hartsdale, Rye or any other Westchester towns.

Let us help you select the right one.  Contact us at DebbieM@KW.com

DMFineHomes.com

914-500-9198

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Westchester Kids Events Week of Dec 17th…

Westchester Kids Events Week of Dec 17th…

Don’t miss out on fun family and kids activities this weekend in Westchester! Fairs, theaters, concerts, museums-your choices are endless. Find these and more in our list of this weekend’s best family and kids activities in Westchester. Or, browse the NY Metro Parents’ calendar for upcoming weekend family and children events.

Annual Holiday Party – Little Gym of the Scarsdale
December 17, 2010 – Scarsdale

Little Gym of Scarsdale on 12/17/10 to celebrate the holidays for a good cause.

Critters, Crafts, and Kids – Greenburgh Nature Center
December 15, 2010 – Scarsdale

Walks, live animals, stories, and crafts.

Book Babies – The Field Library
December 15, 2010 – Peekskill

Stories, songs, fingerplays, puppets, play time.

Mixing in Math Club – The Field Library
December 15, 2010 – Peekskill

Explore the world of numbers with math games and creative activities.

Graham Clarke Live – Harrison Public Library
December 15, 2010 – Harrison

Children’s musician Graham Clarke will perform.

A Night on the Town – Rainwater Grill
December 15, 2010 – Hastings-on-Hudson

Food, wine, music, live entertainment, and silent and live auctions. Proceeds benefit the Broadway Training Center.

Intergenerational Chess Club – Greenburgh Public Library
December 15, 2010 – Elmsford

Improve your game or simply get involved by learning the moves of chess from top teen players. Greenburgh Library

Teen Talk Book Club – Greenburgh Public Library
December 15, 2010 – Elmsford

Read and discuss “Skellig,” by David Almond. Registration is required.

Babies and Bagels – Temple Israel Center
December 16, 2010 – White Plains

Share coffee, bagels, and conversation with other moms and meet a different TIC clergy member or professional each month.

Multilingual Mother Goose – Chappaqua Library
December 16, 2010 – Chappaqua

Learn and share rhymes and songs in different languages. Registration is required.

Young Critics Book Discussion – Chappaqua Public Library
December 16, 2010 – Chappaqua Library

Read and discuss the newest titles and enjoy snacks. The book list is available in children’s room. Registration is required.

The Nutcracker – Westchester County Center
December 17, 2010 – White Plains

Westchester Ballet Company’s production of this magical family holiday classic with classic choreography and special stage effects. Featuring American Ballet Theatre’s Mikhail Ilyin as the Cavalier and Renata Pavam as the Sugar Plum Fairy, and pre-professional dancers from the area.

Applause Westchester Superstars Show – Murray Avenue Elementary School Auditorium
December 17, 2010 – Larchmont

An end-of-semester show performed by the kindergarten-5th grade students, with a special performance by the Applause weekend workshop cast.

Tales for Tots – The Field Library
December 17, 2010 – Peekskill

Drop in for stories, songs and fingerplays.

Trains Your Ticket to the Great Outdoors

Through Dec 19th – Scarsdale

A display of model trains, presented by the Westchester Model Railroad Club.

Greenburgh Nature Center

Arnie Zimmerman: New Lost City – Clay Art Center
Through December 18, 2010 – Port Chester

The internationally renowned Brooklyn artist will be exhibiting “the art of clay” with an arrangement of objects from his Inner City installations, which are epic narratives of urban growth, decay, change and life itself.

Nature Lovers and Artists – Weinberg Nature Center
December 18, 2010 – Scarsdale

Join local artist Mike Teator and explore the world of water color using scenes from the Westchester parks. Preregistration is suggested.

Gingerbread Cookie Decorating Workshops – Ritz-Carlton Westchester
December 18, 2010 – White Plains

After donning chef’s hats and aprons, go on a tour of the hotel’s kitchens, and then decorate gingerbread cookies alongside the pastry chef. The child with the best decorated cookie will win a special gift. Refreshments will be served. Reservations are required; space is limited.

Saturdays, Dec 18, from 9 to 11 a.m, the hotel will offer fun-filled Gingerbread Cookie Decorating Workshops. After donning chef’s hats and aprons, children will be taken on a tour of the hotel’s kitchens, and then will decorate gingerbread cookies alongside The Ritz-Carlton’s pastry chef. The child with the best decorated cookie will even win a special gift! Refreshments will be served. The cost for the Gingerbread Cookie Decorating Workshop is $30 per person

It’s A Wonderful Life – Jacob Burns Film Center
December 18, 2010 – Pleasantville

A holiday tradition, see the Christmas classic on the big screen.

The Nutcracker – Westchester County Center
December 18, 2010 – White Plains

Westchester Ballet Company’s production of this magical family holiday classic with classic choreography and special stage effects. Featuring American Ballet Theatre’s Mikhail Ilyin as the Cavalier and Renata Pavam as the Sugar Plum Fairy, and pre-professional dancers from the area.

Sculpting With Baker’s Clay – White Plains Public Library
December 18, 2010 – White Plains

Westchester artist Susan Ordahl explains how to combine salt, flour, and water to create a durable dough that can be made into ornaments that can last for years. A variety of creative ideas and techniques will be shared to inspire further exploration with this handy home concoction.

World of Mammals – Westmoreland Sanctuary
December 18, 2010 – Mount Kisco

Discover the world of mammals through this interactive program. Skulls, bones, and a bunny will illustrate the variety of animals in the mammalian world. RSVP is requested.

Family Jams – Groove Performing Arts
December 18, 2010 – Larchmont

Sing, dance, jam to Music for Aardvarks during this interactive musical experience. Registration is required.

Annual Christmas Bird Count – Teatown Lake Reservation
December 18, 2010 – Ossining

Hike the trails to count wintering birds. The information gathered is compiled and sent to National Audubon, which uses the information to monitor trends in populations and other conservation issues that impact avian health. Afterwards, join birders from all over Northern Westchester at the compilation dinner. Preregistration is required.

Saturday Specials – Chappaqua Library
December 18, 2010 – Chappaqua

Stories, songs, and sensory activities for special needs kids and their families.

Pack Chat for Kids – Wolf Conservation Center
December 18, 2010 – South Salem

Learn about the mythology surrounding wolves and the important role of wolves in the natural world. Visit Ambassador wolves Kaila and Atka as well as the WCC’s critically endangered red wolves and Mexican gray wolves. Preregistration is required.

Family Art Project: Sparkle and Shine – Wave Hill
December 18, 2010 – Bronx

Combine shiny foil, glittery beads, and natural wonders like cones and spices and fashion them into glowing gifts and decorations.

American People Black Light: Faith Ringgold’s Paintings of the 1960s – Neuberger Museum of Art
Through December 19, 2010 – Purchase

This exhibition features the artist’s two earliest series, American People (1962-1967) and Black Light (1967-1969), which explores race and conflict in the United States.

Pat Steir: Drawing Out of Line – Neuberger Museum of Art
Through December 19, 2010 – Purchase

This exhibition highlights forty years of Steir’s work in a survey that focuses on her exploration of the vocabulary of drawing.

Faith Ringgold’s American People and Black Light: Paintings of the 1960s – Neuberger Museum of Art
Through December 19, 2010 – Purchase

For fifty years, Faith Ringgold has used her art to comment on racism and gender inequality. Though best known as the progenitor of the African American story quilt revival that began in the 1970s, it is her pointed political paintings of the 1960s–many of which disappeared from view-that are the focus of this exhibition. Approximately sixty works will be on view.

Trains Your Ticket to the Great Outdoors – Greenburgh Nature Center
Through December 19, 2010 – Scarsdale

A display of model trains, presented by the Westchester Model Railroad Club.

Gifted – The Voracious Reader
Through December 19, 2010 – Larchmont

An exhibition with an emphasis on the innate gift of humankind as told through picture books.

Christmas Tree Sale – North White Plains Fire Company #1
Through December 24, 2010 – North White Plains

Purchase your Christmas tree and help raise funds for the North White Plains Fire Company.

A Sleepy Hollow Christmas Carol – Westchester Broadway Theatre
Through December 26, 2010 – Elmsford

A new family musical based on the characters of Charles Dickens and Washington Irving, the tale begins in the Town of Sleepy Hollow in 1900 on Christmas Eve. Ebeneezer Scrooge is a greedy and stingy businessman who has no time for kindness, compassion, charity or benevolence. He is visited by three ghosts who accompany him to various scenes in his life with the hope of achieving a transformation. The spirits appear in the form of Washington Irving, Rip Van Winkle and The Headless Horseman. Find out if he’ll mend his ways and change these “shadows of what may be?”

A Fairy Tale Holiday – Lyndhurst
Through December 26, 2010 – Tarrytown

See sixteen rooms transformed into a fairy tale fantasy. Enjoy live holiday music and hot cider and cookies. Reservations are recommended.

Youngest Critics Club – Larchmont Public Library
Through December 28, 2010 – Larchmont

Talk and blog about new children’s books. A parent or caregiver should stay in the children’s room during the program.

Stories & Tales – Larchmont Public Library
Through December 28, 2010 – Larchmont

Interactive story time. A parent or caregiver must attend with the child.

A Christmas Carol – A Ghost Story of Christmas – Westchester Sandbox Theatre
Through December 31, 2010 – Mamaroneck

An adaptation of Dickens’ classic story. Reservations are suggested.

Board Game Night – Lola’s Tea House
Through December 31, 2010 – Pelham

Take a chance and demonstrate your skill and strategy playing some of the most well known games. Bring your favorite board game and try to win prizes.

Botanicals: Environmental Expressions in Art, The Alisa and Isaac M. Sutton Collection – New York Botanical Garden
Through January 09, 2011 –

The exhibition features works from the private collection of Isaac Sutton—the largest American collection of contemporary botanical art. The body of work documents a wide variety of plant life in aesthetically stunning fashion and comes to the Garden after a long and successful run at Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh.

Mapping: Memory and Motion in Contemporary Art – Katonah Museum of Art
Through January 09, 2011 – Katonah

This exhibition—which includes paintings, works on paper, sculpture, video, and a live web broadcast—takes a look at current map-based works that represent actual locations–real and imagined. Encompassing the stars, the land, and the built environment, it explores various strategies that artists are using to track their subjects, distilling them into art objects and activities that choreograph location through time and space.

19th Annual Holiday Train Show – New York Botanical Garden
Through January 09, 2011 – Bronx

One of the most eagerly anticipated traditions of the season, the critically acclaimed Holiday Train Show presents an enchanted New York, wrapped in the glow of twinkling lights. More than a dozen large-scale model railway trains—from late-1800s American steam engines and streetcars, whimsical ladybugs and circus cars, to modern freight and high-speed passenger trains and trolleys—traverse nearly a quarter-mile of track across rustic bridges, along overhead trestles, through tunnels, and past waterfalls that cascade into flowing creeks. Also new this year, Thomas the Tank Engine™ will join the fleet of model trains animating replicas such as the Statue of Liberty, Radio City Music Hall, Rockefeller Center, St. Patrick’s Cathedral, Ellis Island, the Brooklyn Bridge, and the original Penn Station and Yankee Stadium—all created from plant parts. New York Botanical Gardens

CRAFT-TASTIC – Pelham Art Center
Through January 15, 2011 – Pelham

An annual artisan exhibit featuring an intimate arrangement of sculptural objects, artwork, and jewelry by various working artists throughout New York and across the US. In the main gallery space, Christine Milo, Gallery and Program Manager, presents an eclectic mix of modern craftwork. In the front gallery, Leigh Taylor Mickelson of Clay Art Center, has curated a ceramic exhibit showcasing affordable, functional and decorative items that make great gifts. All work is for sale and includes a range of affordable items.

Toyland – Yorktown Museum
Through February 27, 2011 – Yorktown Heights

New gifts and traditional favorites like “Hot Wheels” on the race track, dolls, clowns, teddy bears, and games will be on display.

George Sherwood’s Wind Orchid – Katonah Museum of Art
Through May 22, 2011 – Katonah

Wind Orchid is a 24-foot-tall kinetic sculpture that gracefully responds to the changing environment outside the Museum. The wind choreographs the speed and rotation of the tendrils while stainless steel leaves reflect glimpses of sun and sky.

BTW, Interest rates are already on the rise and home sales are picking up, so take advantage now, while it’s still a buyer’s market and interest rates are still close to their record lows. Let us help you throughout Westchester: Scarsdale, New Rochelle, Larchmont, Edgemont, Pelham, White Plains, Harrison, Mamaroneck, Hartsdale, Rye or any other Westchester towns.

Let us help you select the right one.  Contact us at DebbieM@KW.com

DMFineHomes.com

914-500-9198


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Using Feng Shui When Purchasing a Home

Feng Shui Today

By Jeff Meiliken

If moving the furniture around an office can make a huge impact on a multi-billion dollar business, imagine what it can do for your home and family life.

While living in San Francisco, a manager at The Gap Headquarters heard I did Feng Shui and asked if I could help with one of the offices. Within a week we got both her assistants promoted. Word spread, and so did the positive results. Then one of the senior VPs asked me to do his office. It overlooked imposing concrete stanchions of the Bay Bridge. I moved his desk and had a large mirror brought it to draw in the view and energy of the Bay, rather than the concrete.

Within the month, he became President of Banana Republic.

Every day, we use  Feng Shui to help clients choose the right home for them to prosper in, and sometimes to help correct negative energy flows in homes that people are already living in.

Feng Shui is about opening up the energy…

Feng Shui Tips in Choosing a Home: Avoid Sha Chi, negative energy

When you buy a home, it’s smart to evaluate the chi (energy) of the area as well as that of the home that you are considering buying. In addition to evaluating the overall state of the neighborhood, keep an eye out for instances of sha chi — “killing chi” or negative energy — directed at your potential new home.

Sha chi can come from arrow-like shapes that funnel energy toward a home:
A street pointed directly at your house – Houses at the end of a T-intersection, where a street with oncoming traffic points directly at the house, are considered inauspicious (bad luck) in Feng Shui.

A sharp roof line from the building across the street – If your neighbor has a steep roof with a sharp roof line that points directly at your entrance, this can cause communication problems and bad relationships with those neighbors, as well as misfortune for you and the other inhabitants of your house.

The sharp corner of a building pointed at your home – More common in cities, like NYC, where residential apartments share streets with buildings and businesses, if the corner of a building points toward your home or apartment, this sha chi may bring you misfortune and struggles.

In some cases, sha chi can be deflected with a Feng Shui ba gua mirror. Bushes, hedges and trees can also be planted, but if you’re investing money in a new house, it’s best to avoid the situation in the first place.

Feng Shui Home Hunting Tips

When you use Feng Shui in your home, apartment or office, it’s important to keep your goals and destination, or your true life purpose, in mind. Does the space suit your lifestyle? Can you live there comfortably? You don’t want to live in conflict with your environment.

The most important places in the home in terms of Feng Shui are the front door, Kitchen and Master Bedroom.

While some of the basic Feng Shui principles are true for nearly every person in every space, it’s important to think about whether or not the energy of a new home matches your chi. Pay attention to your intuition as you first approach a prospective home. Does it feel like the space will help you achieve your goals? Watch for signs of negativity or what you might call omens. If the house feels wrong but you can’t pinpoint why, it probably is.

Within a home, dust bunnies collect where the negativity is, so does discoloring on the walls. Junk and clutter follow those negativity trails as well. Outside, dead patches of lawn (without a suitable explanation), dying shrubs and trees too show a weakened life force prevails.

Also, avoid homes at the very bottom of a hill. It’s also best not to be at the top-most point either.

Were you, or was anyone, fighting when you visited the home? The walls and beams of a home witness all that goes on there and transmit it to visitors and new residents. Often this can be cleansed out. Email me and I’ll help you with that, but sometimes the troubles can go deeper.

Pay Attention to the Signs

When you first go to look at a home, it may be best to avoid the property where there’s a dead bird or animal in front. If a hearse or ambulance is parked nearby, it’s not a good sign either.  Avoid any home in front of a funeral parlour or cemetery.

Lively flowing water, fountains, flowers, lush foliage, kids playing, and happy pets are all signs of thriving life (good chi), which you want in a home and for your family.

Stores going out of business, or run-down buildings don’t make for good neighbors; they are signs of negativity.

Remember, employing Feng Shui when you first select a home often works better than trying to employ Feng Shui tips and cures after you are already settled in a space.

Feng Shui Staging or Decorating Tips

Make sure the energy flows around a room and the house. Create open spaces. Allow good views and light the space to fill a room; don’t block it with furniture or clutter. Use mirrors to reflect and channel that light/view/energy throughout the house. Use green plants/trees to soften overpowering energy. Small fountains, waterfalls, orchids and other live flowers help refresh the energy. Don’t wall off space or foreshorten room dimensions. Open is always better.
If you’re buying a new home, I can help with the Feng Shui and your home selection. Why don’t you give us call at 914-500-9198. Email.

With these record low interest rates, now is the time to buy your homes in Scarsdale, New Rochelle, Larchmont, Edgemont, Pelham, White Plains, Harrison, Mamaroneck, Hartsdale, Rye or any other Westchester towns.

Let us help you select the right one.  Contact us at DebbieM@KW.com

DMFineHomes.com

914-500-9198

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Events in Westchester Dec 3rd 2010

Events in Westchester Starting Dec 3rd 2010

Singles

1) Meet The Farmer: Winter Roots - Saturday December 11, 2010 – The farmer-hosted tour and discussion explores the subject of growing winter roots on the farm. Stone Barns Center For Food And Agriculture, Pocantico Hills NY 914.366.6200 or visit www.stonebarnscenter.org, check to see if reservation sare needed

2) Single Gourmet Gala - Saturday December 11, 2010 – Mingle with other singles and enjoy a four-course holiday wine dinner at the Equus restaurant in Tarrytown NY 10591.  Contact 914.600.4267 or www.singlegourmet-metrony.com for more info and reservations.

3) Single Gourmet Cocktail Party - Friday December 17, 2010 – Meet other foodies and singles at a creative holiday cocktail party, Via Vanti Mt Kisco NY 10549.  Contact 914.600.4267 or www.singlegourmet-metrony.com

4) Farm To Table: Winter Roots - Sunday December 19, 2010 – Harvest ingredients from out in the field, then hand them over to Blue Hills chefs to mkae a farm-to-table meal with seasonal foods.  Stone Barns Center For Food & Agriculture, Pocantico Hills NY.  for more info and reservations contact 914.366.6200 or www.stonebarnscenter.org

Comedy

MAMARONECK Emelin Theater Judy Gold. Dec. 17 at 8 p.m. $32. Emelin Theater, 153 Library Lane. emelin.org; (914) 698-0098.

POUGHKEEPSIE Bananas Comedy Club Billy Garan. Friday and Dec. 11. $12 and $15. Bananas Comedy Club, 2170 Route 9. (845) 462-3333; bananascomedyclub.com.

Film

IRVINGTON Irvington Town Hall Theater “Who is Harry Nilsson (And Why is Everybody Talkin’ About Him)?” Directed by John Scheinfeld. Wednesday at 8 p.m. $8. Irvington Town Hall Theater, 85 Main Street. irvingtontheater.com; (914) 591-6602.

KINGSTON Ulster Performing Arts Center “The Princess Bride,” directed by Rob Reiner. Dec. 17 at 7:30 p.m. $5. “The Met Live in HD: Don Carlo,” simulcast of the opera by Verdi. Dec. 18 at 12:30 p.m. $16 to $23. Ulster Performing Arts Center, 601 Broadway. (845) 339-6088; upac.org.

MAMARONECK Emelin Theater “If I Want to Whistle, I Whistle,” directed by Florin Serban. Dec. 14 at 7:30 p.m. $15. Emelin Theater, 153 Library Lane. (914) 698-0098; emelin.org.

PLEASANTVILLE Jacob Burns Film Center “Catching Up Film Series.” Through Dec. 22. $6 to $11. Jacob Burns Film Center, 364 Manville Road. burnsfilmcenter.org; (914) 747-5555.

TARRYTOWN Tarrytown Music Hall “From Here to Eternity,” starring Burt Lancaster, Montgomery Clift and Frank Sinatra. Tuesday at 8 p.m. $7. “Rashomon,” directed by Akira Kurosawa. Friday at 7:30 p.m. $5 and $7. “Yojimbo,” directed by Akira Kurosawa. Dec. 19 at 6 p.m. $5 and $7. Tarrytown Music Hall, 13 Main Street. (877) 840-0457; tarrytownmusichall.org.

WHITE PLAINS Arts Exchange “Metropolis,” silent film accompanied by Kurt Coble and P. A. M. Band of Robotic Instruments. Dec. 5 at 5 p.m. Free. Arts Exchange, 31 Mamaroneck Avenue. (914) 428-4220; westarts.com.

For Children

IRVINGTON Irvington Town Hall Theater “A Year With Frog and Toad,” musical by Willie Reale and Robert Reale. Presented by the Clocktower Players Kids Troupe. Ages 3 and up. Dec. 11 and 12 at 12:30 p.m. $10 and $15. Irvington Town Hall Theater, 85 Main Street. (914) 591-6602; irvingtontheater.com.

KATONAH Muscoot Farm “Christmas on the Farm,” carols and a lantern tour. Dec. 11 and 12, 5 to 7 p.m. Donations accepted. Muscoot Farm, 51 Route 100. (914) 864-7282; muscootfarm.org.

NORTH SALEM Ruth Keeler Memorial Library “Gingerbread Man Storytime,” stories, games and activities. All ages. Dec. 11 at 10:30 a.m. Free. Ruth Keeler Memorial Library, 276 Titicus Road. (914) 669-5161; ruthkeelermemoriallibrary.org.

PEEKSKILL Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art “Family Art Weekend,” performances and activities, along with Eastern and Central European crafts. Dec. 5, 1 to 5 p.m. All ages. Free. Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art, 1701 Main Street. hvcca.com; (914) 788-0100.

Museums and Galleries

BEACON Dia:Beacon “Franz Erhard Walther: Work as Action.” Through Feb. 13. $7 to $10; members and children under 12, free. Fridays through Mondays, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dia:Beacon, 3 Beekman Street. diabeacon.org; (845) 440-0100.

BEACON Fovea Exhibitions Beacon Gallery “One Block: A New Orleans Neighborhood Rebuilds,” photographs by Dave Anderson. Through Jan. 8. Fridays through Sundays, noon to 6 p.m. Fovea Exhibitions Beacon Gallery, 143 Main Street. (845) 765-2199; foveaexhibitions.org.

CHAPPAQUA Horace Greeley House “Reader’s Digest: The Local Magazine That Conquered the World,”photographs and artifacts. Through January. Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, 1 to 4 p.m. or by appointment. Horace Greeley House, 100 King Street. newcastlehs.org;

(914) 238-4666.

COLD SPRING Putnam County Historical Society and Foundry School Museum “Making a Living: Businesses in Philipstown and Beyond, 1850-1970,” photographs, artifacts and memorabilia. Through Dec. 19. $2 to $5; members and children under 7, free. Wednesdays through Sundays, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Putnam County Historical Society and Foundry School Museum, 63 Chestnut Street. (845) 265-4010; pchs-fsm.org.

CROSS RIVER Trailside Nature Museum “Affinities,” sculptures and paintings by David Safhay. Through Dec. 30. Tuesdays through Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Trailside Nature Museum, Routes 35 and 121. (914) 864-7322; trailsidemuseum.org.CROTON FALLS The Schoolhouse Theater Gallery “Whoopee We’re All Gonna Die,” works by Susan Zoon and Nicolas De Jesus. Through Dec. 12. Call for hours. The Schoolhouse Theater Gallery, 3 Owens Road. schoolhousetheater.org; (914) 277-3461.

DOBBS FERRY The Donald Gallery Paintings by Rene Nascimento. Through Dec. 12. Tuesdays through Sundays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Donald Gallery, 343 Broadway. southpres.org/thedonaldgallery.shtml; (914) 693-0473.

DOBBS FERRY Upstream Gallery Joan Gillman Smith, paintings and collages. Through Dec. 5. Thursdays through Sundays, 12:30 to 5:30 p.m. Upstream Gallery, 26B Main Street. upstreamgallery.com; (914) 674-8548.

EASTCHESTER Eastchester Public Library “Hudson River Potters Annual Show and Sale,” ceramics. Friday through Dec. 5. Eastchester Public Library, 11 Oakridge Place. hudsonriverpotters.com; (914) 793-5055.

HARRISON Harrison Public Library “Favorite Things,” acrylic paintings by Robert Cotnoir. Dec. 5 through Jan. 7. Mondays and Wednesdays, 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Sundays, 1 to 5 p.m. Harrison Public Library, 2 Bruce Avenue. (914) 835-0324; harrisonpl.org.

HUDSON BCB Art “Thunder Bunny Buddha Shrine,” works by Musho Rodney Alan Greenblat. Through Dec. 19. Thursdays through Sunday, noon to 6 p.m.; or by appointment. BCB Art, 116 Warren Street. (518) 828-4539; bcbart.com.

KATONAH Katonah Museum of Art “Mapping: Memory and Motion in Contemporary Art,” multimedia. “Uri Shulevitz: How I Learned Geography.” “Watercolor,” by Dan Osyczka. All three run through Jan. 9. “Wind Orchid,” by George Sherwood, sculpture. Through May 22. $3 to $5; members and children, free. Tuesdays through Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sundays, noon to 5 p.m. Katonah Museum of Art, 134 Jay Street. (914) 232-9555; katonahmuseum.org.

LARCHMONT The Voracious Reader “The Many Gifts of Children’s Book Illustrators,” picture book art. Dec. 5 through Dec. 19. Mondays through Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Sundays, noon to 4 p.m. The Voracious Reader, 1997 Palmer Avenue. thevoraciousreader.com; (914) 630-4581.

PEEKSKILL BeanRunner Cafe “Working in Proximity: Artists of the Flat Iron and Brown Street Studios,” group show. Through Jan. 29. BeanRunner Cafe, 201 South Division Street. (914) 737-1701; beanrunnercafe.com.

PEEKSKILL Flat Iron Gallery “Gifts of Fire and Clay,” group show. Thursday through Dec. 31. Thursdays through Sundays, noon to 6 p.m.; or by appointment. Flat Iron Gallery, 105 South Division Street. flatiron.qpg.com; (914) 734-1894.

PEEKSKILL Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art “Artist in Residence,” Leonardo Silaghi, paintings. Through Dec. 19. “After the Fall,” group show featuring contemporary art from Eastern and Central Europe. Through July 24. $2 to $5; members, free. Saturdays and Sundays, noon to 6 p.m.; or by appointment. Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art, 1701 Main Street. (914) 788-0100; hvcca.com.

PEEKSKILL Innovative Arts Gallery “That Which Roars: Beasts of the Imagination,” group show. Through Jan. 9. Fridays through Sundays, noon to 6 p.m.; or by appointment. Innovative Arts Gallery, 1 South Division Street, Studio 1. (914) 930-1474; innovative-arts.com.

PEEKSKILL The H-Art Gallery “Wrecktify,” paintings by Jeffrey Schrier. Through Jan. 10. Free. Mondays through Fridays, 3 to 7 p.m.; and by appointment. The H-Art Gallery , 1 South Division Street. (914) 788-4038.

PELHAM Pelham Art Center “Craft-Tastic” and “Gift It,” handmade goods. Friday through Jan. 15. “Diwali: Hindu Festival of Lights,” performances and activities. Dec. 5 at 1:30 p.m. Free. Tuesdays through Fridays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pelham Art Center, 155 Fifth Avenue. (914) 738-2525; pelhamartcenter.org.

PORT CHESTER Clay Art Center “Arnie Zimmerman: New Lost City.” Through Dec. 18. Mondays through Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Clay Art Center, 40 Beech Street. clayartcenter.org; (914) 937-2047.

POUGHKEEPSIE Locust Grove “Being in Code,” works by Douglas Navarra. Through Dec. 5. $5 and $9; children 18 and under, free. Daily, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Locust Grove, 2683 South Road (Route 9). (845) 454-4500; lgny.org.

PURCHASE Berger Gallery “W. P. A. Posters From the Collection of Merrill C. Berman.” Through Dec. 17. Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Wednesdays, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturdays, noon to 4 p.m. Berger Gallery at Manhattanville College, 2900 Purchase Street. (914) 323-5331; mville.edu.

PURCHASE Neuberger Museum of Art “Pat Steir: Drawing Out of Line” and “American People, Black Light: Faith Ringgold’s Paintings of the 1960s.” Both through Dec. 19. $3 to $5. Tuesdays through Sundays, noon to 5 p.m. Neuberger Museum of Art, 735 Anderson Hill Road. (914) 251-6100; neuberger.org.

RHINEBECK Montgomery Row Second Level “small ink,” drawings and paintings by Jeff Romano. Monday through Jan. 28. Mondays through Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Montgomery Row Second Level, 6422-3 Montgomery Street. (845) 876-6670; montgomeryrow.com.

SCARSDALE Greenburgh Nature Center “Trains,” model trains, presented by the Westchester Model Railroad Club. Dec. 11 through Dec. 19. $1 and $2. Mondays through Thursdays, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Saturdays and Sundays, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Greenburgh Nature Center, 99 Dromore Road. (914) 723-3470; greenburghnaturecenter.org.

WEST NYACK Rockland Center for the Arts “Kate Gilmore: Standing Here.” Through Dec. 5. “On Earth,” group show and “Lothar Osterburg: Piranesi.” Through Dec. 12. Mondays through Fridays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays and Sundays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Rockland Center for the Arts, 27 South Greenbush Road. rocklandartcenter.org; (845) 358-0877.

WHITE PLAINS Arts Exchange “Latin American Paper Arts Exhibition.” Through Dec. 5. Tuesdays through Saturdays, noon to 5 p.m. Arts Exchange, 31 Mamaroneck Avenue. westarts.com; (914) 428-4220.

WOODSTOCK Galerie BMG Alyson Belcher, photographs. Through Jan. 10. Fridays through Mondays, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., or by appointment. Galerie BMG, 12 Tannery Brook Road. (845) 679-0027; galeriebmg.com.

YONKERS Hudson River Museum “Paintbox Leaves: Autumnal Inspiration from Cole to Wyeth,” group show. Through Jan. 16. $3 to $5; members, free. Wednesdays through Sundays, noon to 5 p.m. Hudson River Museum, 511 Warburton Avenue. (914) 963-4550; hrm.org.

Music and Dance

CHAPPAQUA Chappaqua Library Akiko Kobayashi, violin and Claudia Kobayashi, piano. Dec. 5 at 2 p.m. $15 suggested donation. Chappaqua Library, 195 South Greeley Avenue. chappaqualibrary.org; (914) 238-4779.

BEDFORD “Will Dance for Food,” dancers and choreographers unite to raise awareness and funds for Westchester’s most needy. Dec. 5 at 5:30 p.m. $20 to $50. Fox Lane High School, 632 South Bedford Road. willdanceforfood.com; (914) 682-2737.

IRVINGTON Irvington Town Hall Theater “Bach Meets Bebop,” featuring Gary Smulyan and Henk van Twillert. Friday at 8 p.m. $28. The Subdudes, jazz. Dec. 11 at 8 p.m. $40. “An Evening with Sutton Foster,” cabaret. Dec. 12 at 7:30 p.m. $35 to $50. Irvington Town Hall Theater, 85 Main Street. irvingtontheater.com; (914) 591-6602.

KINGSTON Ulster Performing Arts Center Cyndi Lauper, pop. Dec. 14 at 7:30 p.m. $42 to $65. Ulster Performing Arts Center, 601 Broadway. (845) 339-6088; upac.org.

LARCHMONT Watercolor Cafe Karla Bonoff, pop. Dec. 5 at 7 p.m. $45. Marshall Crenshaw, folk and rock. Thursday at 8 p.m. $35. Ari Hest, alternative folk. Dec. 14 at 8 p.m. $20. The Alternate Routes, folk and rock. Dec. 16 at 8 p.m. $10. Watercolor Cafe, 2094 Boston Post Road. (914) 834-2213; watercolorcafe.net.

MAMARONECK Emelin Theater David Bromberg Quartet, folk. Dec. 5 at 8 p.m. $60. Gold Heart with Buddy Merriam and Backroads, bluegrass. Friday at 8 p.m. $32. Kelli O’Hara, cabaret. Dec. 11 at 3 and 8 p.m. $60. Emelin Theater, 153 Library Lane. (914) 698-0098; emelin.org.

MARLBORO The Falcon Niels Lan Doky and Larry Grenadier, jazz. Thursday at 7 p.m. “The Ed Palermo Big Band Plays Zappa.” Friday at 7 p.m. Lucky Peterson, blues. Dec. 11 at 7 p.m. Eric Reed, jazz. Dec. 16 at 7 p.m. Al Foster, jazz. Dec. 17 at 6 p.m. Tom Freund and Friends, pop. Dec. 18 at 7 p.m. Donations are accepted for each. The Falcon, 1348 Route 9W. (845) 236-7970; liveatthefalcon.com.

MONTROSE Hendrick Hudson Free Library E. Zoe Hassman, cello. Dec. 5 at 2 p.m. Free. Hendrick Hudson Free Library, 185 Kings Ferry Road. henhudfreelibrary.org; (914) 739-5654.

MOUNT KISCO Merestead “Heaven, Hell and Hollywood,” works by Erich Wolfgang Korngold, Miklos Rozsa and others. Dec. 5 at 3 p.m. $10 to $25. Merestead, 455 Byram Lake Road. (914) 788-4659; coplandhouse.org.

NEW ROCHELLE Christopher J. Murphy Auditorium, Iona College The Westchester Chamber Symphony featuring Lawrence Dutton, violin. Dec. 11 at 8 p.m. $15 to $50. Christopher J. Murphy Auditorium, Iona College, 715 North Avenue. (914) 633-2628; www.iona.edu.

PEEKSKILL Paramount Center for the Arts Nanci Griffith, folk. Friday at 8 p.m. $30 to $40. “A Rockin’ Doo Wop Celebration.” Dec. 11 at 8 p.m. $39 to $59. Paramount Center for the Arts, 1008 Brown Street. (914) 739-2333; paramountcenter.org.

PIERMONT The Turning Point Enter the Haggis, Celtic rock. Dec. 5 at 4 p.m. $20. Bucky Pizzarelli featuring Ed Laub, jazz. Dec. 5 at 7:30 p.m. $20. Elliott Murphy Band, rock. Wednesday at 8 p.m. $20. Alexis P. Suter Band, blues and soul. Friday at 9 p.m. $20. Chris Bergson Band, blues and soul. Dec. 11 at 9 p.m. $20. The Swippers, folk and rock. Dec. 12 at 4 p.m. $10. Suzy Bogguss Band, country. Dec. 13 at 7:30 p.m. $35. Lucky Peterson, blues. Dec. 15 at 8 p.m. $25. The “The Band” Band, tribute concert. Dec. 17 and Dec. 19. $20 and $25. Finn and the Sharks, rockabilly. Dec. 18 at 9 p.m. $25. The Turning Point, 468 Piermont Avenue. (845) 359-1089; turningpointcafe.com.

POUGHKEEPSIE Bardavon Opera House Amos Lee, funk and soul. Dec. 5 at 7 p.m. $28 and $33. “Serkin’s Serenade,” presented by the Hudson Valley Philharmonic. Dec. 19 at 3 p.m. $25 to $47. Bardavon Opera House, 35 Market Street. (845) 473-2072; bardavon.org.

PURCHASE Performing Arts Center Orion String Quartet, classical. Dec. 5 at 3 p.m. $52.50. The Harlem Gospel Choir. Dec. 11 at 8 p.m. $20 to $50. Brandenburg All-Stars, classical. Dec. 12 at 3 p.m. $25 to $50. Performing Arts Center, 735 Anderson Hill Road. (914) 251-6200; artscenter.org.

PURCHASE Recital Hall, Performing Arts Center The New York Chamber Brass. Monday at 8 p.m. Free. Recital Hall, Performing Arts Center, 735 Anderson Hill Road. artscenter.org; (914) 251-6200.

RYE Rye Country Day School Attacca String Quartet, classical. Dec. 5 at 3:30 p.m. $25 suggested donation. Rye Country Day School, 1 Cedar Street. (914) 424-9547; musicforparkinsonsresearch.org.

TARRYTOWN Tarrytown Music Hall Rickie Lee Jones, rock. Dec. 5 at 8 p.m. $45 to $75. The Chords, doo wop. Dec. 11 at 8 p.m. $40 and $45. Cyndi Lauper, pop. Dec. 15 at 8 p.m. $50 to $95. Johnny Winter and Hubert Sumlin, rock. Dec. 16 at 8 p.m. $39 to $65. Tarrytown Music Hall, 13 Main Street. (877) 840-0457; tarrytownmusichall.org.

WHITE PLAINS Arts Exchange “World Fusion: Music of the Middle East,” featuring Gaida Hinnawi. Dec. 5 at 8 p.m. $15 and $20. Tuesdays through Saturdays, noon to 5 p.m. Arts Exchange, 31 Mamaroneck Avenue. (914) 428-4220; westarts.com.

WHITE PLAINS Music Conservatory of Westchester “Performathon 2010,” music, holiday crafts fair and foods from around the world. Dec. 11, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Free admission. Music Conservatory of Westchester, 216 Central Avenue. (914) 761-3900; musicconservatory.org.

Outdoors

OSSINING Teatown Lake Reservation “Hike the Teatown-Kitchawan Trail,” walk along the reservoir and over Bald Mountain. Dec. 5, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Both are $5; members, free. Teatown Lake Reservation, 1600 Spring Valley Road. (914) 762-2912; teatown.org.

POCANTICO HILLS Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture “Winter on the Farm Weekend,” activities, crafts and holiday market. Dec. 11 and 12. Free admission. Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture, 630 Bedford Road. stonebarnscenter.org; (914) 366-6200.

RYE Edith G. Read Wildlife Sanctuary “Winter Wildflower Arrangements,” create a bouquet using dried plants and natural objects. Bring your own vase. Dec. 11 at 1 p.m. Free. Edith G. Read Wildlife Sanctuary, Playland Parkway. (914) 967-8720; westchestergov.com/parks.

SCARSDALE Greenburgh Nature Center “Sacred Circle Dance and Pachamama Renewal,” traditional rituals. Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. Greenburgh Nature Center, 99 Dromore Road. (914) 723-3470; greenburghnaturecenter.org.

Seasonal

ARMONK Whippoorwill Hall “It Happened One Christmas Eve,” musical by Bob Fitzimmons and Barbara Campbell. Through Dec. 12. $14 and $18. Whippoorwill Hall, 19 Whippoorwill East. (914) 273-3887; armonkplayers.org.

BEACON Mount Gulian Historic Site “Candlelight Tour.” featuring actors in character. 3 to 7 p.m. Dec. 19. $4 to $8. Mount Gulian Historic Site, 145 Sterling Street. (845) 831-8172; mountgulian.org.

BEDFORD Bedford Presbyterian Church “A Candlelight Christmas Concert,” presented by the Charis Chamber Voices. Dec. 5 at 4 p.m. $20 and $25. Bedford Presbyterian Church, Village Green. (914) 931-6575; charisvocals.com.

CROSS RIVER Trailside Nature Museum “Holiday Decorations From Nature,” craft activities. Dec. 11 at 1 p.m. $4 and $8. Trailside Nature Museum, Routes 35 and 121. (914) 864-7322; trailsidemuseum.org.

ELMSFORD Westchester Broadway Theater “Holiday Doo Wop Night.” Monday at 6:15 p.m. $75 for dinner and show. “Andy Cooney’s Classic Irish Christmas.” Dec. 13 at 11:30 a.m. and 6:15 p.m. $62 and $75. “A John Denver Christmas Starring Jim Curry.” Dec. 14 at 6:15 p.m. $75 for dinner and show. “A Sleepy Hollow Christmas Carol,” musical by Jean-Paul Richard, based on the stories by Charles Dickens and Washington Irving. Through Dec. 26. $52 to $75. Westchester Broadway Theater, 75 Clearbrook Road. broadwaytheatre.com; (914) 592-2222.

GARRISON Boscobel House and Gardens “Holiday Party With the Fezziwigs,” staged reading of excerpts from “A Christmas Carol” by the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival and refreshments. Friday, 6 to 8 p.m., and Dec. 11, 5 to 7 p.m. $75. Boscobel House and Gardens, 1601 Route 9D. (845) 265-3638; boscobel.org.

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Events in Westchester

Events in Westchester

A guide to cultural and recreational goings-on in and around the Hudson Valley.


Comedy

ELMSFORD Westchester Broadway Theater “The Meatball and the Matzo Ball,” stand-up. Monday at 6:15 p.m. $75 for dinner and show. Westchester Broadway Theater, 75 Clearbrook Road. (914) 592-2222; broadwaytheatre.com.

POUGHKEEPSIE Bananas Comedy Club Bobby Collins. Friday at 9 p.m. $20. Dan Wilson. Nov. 27. $15. Bananas Comedy Club, 2170 Route 9. bananascomedyclub.com; (845) 462-3333.

TARRYTOWN Tarrytown Music Hall “Kevin Meaney Christmas Show,” stand-up. Dec. 4 at 8 p.m. $29.50 to $43.50. Tarrytown Music Hall, 13 Main Street. (877) 840-0457; tarrytownmusichall.org.

Film

PLEASANTVILLE Jacob Burns Film Center “SoLa, Louisiana Water Stories,” by Jon Bowermaster. Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. “Bogart,” film series, with nine films starring Humphrey Bogart. Through Wednesday. Both are $6 to $11. Jacob Burns Film Center, 364 Manville Road. (914) 747-5555; burnsfilmcenter.org.

POUGHKEEPSIE Bardavon Opera House “A Christmas Story,” starring Peter Billingsley. Dec. 3 at 8 p.m. $5. Bardavon Opera House, 35 Market Street. bardavon.org; (845) 473-2072.

For Children

White Plains

Ritz-Carlton, Westchester, in White Plains is doing that might get you in the mood. On Sunday the 5th, The Ritz is hosting Breakfast with Santa at 8:30am. It’ll set you back $45, but kids under 3 are free. The following Sunday, the hotel is hosting a Winter Holiday Festival from 1pm to 3pm which includes a visit from Westchester Ballet Company’s “Nutcracker,” food, cookie decorating, and more. The cost is $40 for a family of four or $15 per person. Kids under 3 are free. The hotel is also hosting gingerbread cookie decorating workshops on the 4th, 11th, and 18th from 9am to 11am. Whew. That’s one busy place!

And for the 21st consecutive season, you can catch Frosty the Snowman at The Rochambeau Theater in White Plains. You and your little ones (recommended for PreK to 3rd Grade) can catch it on December 4 at 11 am or December 6, 7, and 8 at 10:30am. Seats are 14 bucks a pop!

Chanukah Wonderland. Fire and Ice Party on December 5th 11:00- 12:30 pm Live 5 ft menorah sculpting, icing donuts, snow cones, latkas, fire eater, Chanukah gelt, Ice sculpting show, dreidels, music and more 20 Greenidge Ave, White Plains, HIWP ballroom $10/person or $36/family. Chabadofwestchester.com

Chappaqua

The Third Annual New Castle Community Sing. It’s kind of a variety show meets sing-a-long that features a lot of local performers. Don’t fret if you don’t know the words to all the songs. The folks here pass out the lyrics so everybody can join in. If you can’t carry a tune in a bucket like me, well then—just listen. The concert is free at the Robert E. Bell Middle School Auditorium at 3:30 on the 4th. If you’re feeling up to it, you can join afterwards at the old Horace Greeley House for the New Castle Historical Society’s holiday tree lighting.

Tarrytown

Of course, Hanukkah has already started and Chabad of The Rivertowns seems to know just how to celebrate with a seasonal boutique and holiday events it calls Hanukkah Wonderland. You can decorate a dreidel, make a Hanukkah candle, go on missions in its glow room, join an archeological dig, participate in its Lego menorah competition—the works! This Sunday, it’ll be hosting the Balloon Mania Hanukkah Family Festival at 1pm, with balloon menorahs and sculptures as well as latkes and donuts. It sounds pretty cool to me and the best part is that it’s free! It’s every day through December 8.

LARCHMONT The Voracious Reader “Hello Kitty Celebration,” games, crafts and readings. All ages. Dec. 4, 2 to 4 p.m. Free admission. The Voracious Reader, 1997 Palmer Avenue. (914) 630-4581;

thevoraciousreader.com.

MAMARONECK Emelin Theater “Charlotte’s Web,” musical based on the story by E. B. White, presented by TheatreWorks U. S. A. Ages 3 and up. Dec. 2 and Dec. 4. $8 to $13. Emelin Theater, 153 Library Lane. emelin.org; (914) 698-0098.

PEEKSKILL Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art “Family Art Weekend,” performances and activities, along with Eastern and Central European crafts. Dec. 4 and Dec. 5, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. All ages. Free. Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art, 1701 Main Street. (914) 788-0100; hvcca.com.

SCARSDALE Greenburgh Nature Center “Nature Bugs,” stories, crafts and games. Ages 3 and up. Mondays at 1:30 p.m. Through Nov. 29. $4 to $9. Greenburgh Nature Center, 99 Dromore Road. greenburghnaturecenter.org; (914) 723-3470.

YONKERS Hudson River Museum “December’s Tales,” storytelling with Jonathan Kruk. Ages 3 and up. Friday at 2 p.m. Free with museum admission. Hudson River Museum, 511 Warburton Avenue. (914) 963-4550; hrm.org.

Museums and Galleries

BEACON Dia:Beacon “Franz Erhard Walther: Work as Action.” Through Feb. 13. $7 to $10; members and children under 12, free. Mondays and Thursdays through Sundays, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dia:Beacon, 3 Beekman Street. (845) 440-0100; diabeacon.org.

BEACON Fovea Exhibitions Beacon Gallery “One Block: A New Orleans Neighborhood Rebuilds,” photographs by Dave Anderson. Through Jan. 8. Fridays through Sundays, noon to 6 p.m. Fovea Exhibitions Beacon Gallery, 143 Main Street. (845) 765-2199; foveaexhibitions.org.

CHAPPAQUA Horace Greeley House “Reader’s Digest: The Local Magazine That Conquered the World,” photographs and artifacts. Through January. Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, 1 to 4 p.m. or by appointment. Horace Greeley House, 100 King Street. newcastlehs.org; (914) 238-4666.

COLD SPRING Putnam County Historical Society and Foundry School Museum “Making a Living: Businesses in Philipstown and Beyond, 1850-1970,” photographs, artifacts and memorabilia. Through Dec. 19. $2 to $5; members and children under 7, free. Wednesdays through Sundays, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Putnam County Historical Society and Foundry School Museum, 63 Chestnut Street. (845) 265-4010; pchs-fsm.org.

CROSS RIVER Trailside Nature Museum “Affinities,” sculptures and paintings by David Safhay. Through Dec. 30. Tuesdays through Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Trailside Nature Museum, Routes 35 and 121. (914) 864-7322; trailsidemuseum.org.

CROTON FALLS The Schoolhouse Theater Gallery “Whoopee We’re All Gonna Die,” works by Susan Zoon and Nicolas De Jesus. Through Dec. 12. Call for hours. The Schoolhouse Theater Gallery, 3 Owens Road. schoolhousetheater.org; (914) 277-3461.

CROTON-ON-HUDSON Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Briarcliff, Croton and Ossining “Arts and Crafts Show,” jewelry, ceramics, paintings and houseware. Dec. 3, 5 to 9 p.m., and Dec. 4, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free. Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Briarcliff, Croton and Ossining, 2021 Albany Post Road. (914) 488-5309; uucroton.org.

DOBBS FERRY The Donald Gallery Paintings by Rene Nascimento. Through Dec. 12. Tuesdays through Sundays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Donald Gallery, 343 Broadway. (914) 693-0473; southpres.org/thedonaldgallery.shtml.

DOBBS FERRY Upstream Gallery Joan Gillman Smith, paintings and collages. Through Dec. 5. Thursdays through Sundays, 12:30 to 5:30 p.m. Upstream Gallery, 26B Main Street. upstreamgallery.com; (914) 674-8548.

EASTCHESTER Eastchester Public Library “Hudson River Potters Annual Show and Sale,” ceramics. Dec. 3 through Dec. 5. Eastchester Public Library, 11 Oakridge Place. hudsonriverpotters.com; (914) 793-5055.

HARRISON Harrison Public Library “Art and Flowers and All Things Organic,” by Bonnell Marie Cotnoir.Through Dec. 4. Mondays and Wednesdays, 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Sundays, 1 to 5 p.m. Harrison Public Library, 2 Bruce Avenue. (914) 835-0324; harrisonpl.org.

HUDSON BCB Art “Thunder Bunny Buddha Shrine,” works by Musho Rodney Alan Greenblat. Through Dec. 19. Thursdays through Sunday, noon to 6 p.m.; or by appointment. BCB Art, 116 Warren Street. (518) 828-4539; bcbart.com.

KATONAH Katonah Museum of Art “Mapping: Memory and Motion in Contemporary Art,” multimedia. “Uri Shulevitz: How I Learned Geography.” “Watercolor,” by Dan Osyczka. All three run through Jan. 9. “Wind Orchid,” by George Sherwood, sculpture. Through May 22. $3 to $5; members and children, free. Tuesdays through Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sundays, noon to 5 p.m. Katonah Museum of Art, 134 Jay Street. (914) 232-9555; katonahmuseum.org.

LARCHMONT Larchmont Public Library “Potpourri,” watercolors and mixed media by Mary Ann Maclellan and “Drawn by Nature,” works by Diane Elliott. Through Nov. 29. Mondays and Thursdays, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sundays, noon to 5 p.m. Larchmont Public Library, 121 Larchmont Avenue. (914) 834-2281; larchmontlibrary.org.

LARCHMONT The Voracious Reader “The Many Gifts of Children’s Book Illustrators,” picture book art. Dec. 5 through Dec. 19. Mondays through Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Sundays, noon to 4 p.m. The Voracious Reader, 1997 Palmer Avenue. thevoraciousreader.com; (914) 630-4581.

MONTROSE Hendrick Hudson Free Library “Recent Watercolors” by Michele Izzo Croft. Through Nov. 29. Mondays through Thursdays, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sundays, 1 to 5 p.m. Hendrick Hudson Free Library, 185 Kings Ferry Road. (914) 739-5654; henhudfreelibrary.org.

OSSINING Ossining Public Library “A Second Look,” cut-paper collages by Susan MacMurdy. Through Nov. 30. Ossining Public Library, 53 Croton Avenue. (914) 941-2416; ossininglibrary.org.

PEEKSKILL Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art “Artist-in-Residence,” Leonardo Silaghi, paintings. Through Dec. 19. “After the Fall,” group show featuring contemporary art from Eastern and Central Europe. Through July 24. $2 to $5; members, free. Saturdays and Sundays, noon to 6 p.m.; or by appointment. Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art, 1701 Main Street. (914) 788-0100; hvcca.com.

PEEKSKILL Innovative Arts Gallery “That Which Roars: Beasts of the Imagination,” group show. Through Jan. 9. Fridays through Sundays, noon to 6 p.m.; or by appointment. Innovative Arts Gallery, 1 South Division Street, Studio 1. (914) 930-1474; innovative-arts.com.

PELHAM Pelham Art Center “Craft-Tastic” and “Gift-It,” handmade goods. Dec. 3 through Jan. 15. Free. Tuesdays through Fridays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pelham Art Center, 155 Fifth Avenue. pelhamartcenter.org; (914) 738-2525.

PORT CHESTER Clay Art Center “Arnie Zimmerman: New Lost City.” Through Dec. 18. Mondays through Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Clay Art Center, 40 Beech Street. clayartcenter.org; (914) 937-2047.

POUGHKEEPSIE Locust Grove “Being in Code,” works by Douglas Navarra. Through Dec. 5. $5 and $9; children 18 and under, free. Daily, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Locust Grove, 2683 South Road (Route 9). (845) 454-4500; lgny.org.

PURCHASE Berger Gallery “W. P. A. Posters From the Collection of Merrill C. Berman.” Through Dec. 17. Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Wednesdays, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturdays, noon to 4 p.m. Berger Gallery, 2900 Purchase Street. (914) 323-5331; mville.edu..

PURCHASE Neuberger Museum of Art “Pat Steir: Drawing Out of Line” and “American People, Black Light: Faith Ringgold’s Paintings of the 1960s.” Both through Dec. 19. $3 to $5. Tuesdays through Sundays, noon to 5 p.m. Neuberger Museum of Art, 735 Anderson Hill Road. (914) 251-6100; neuberger.org.

RHINEBECK Montgomery Row Second Level “Black-and-White Photos in Pairs and Series,” works by Phyllis Marsteller. Through Nov. 30. Mondays through Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Montgomery Row, Second Level, 6422-3 Montgomery Street. montgomeryrow.com; (845) 876-6670.

RYE Rye Arts Center “Jazz: Iconic Portraits and Contemporary Images,” paintings and sculptures. Through Dec. 4. Tuesdays through Fridays, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Rye Arts Center, 51 Milton Road. (914) 967-0700; ryeartscenter.org.

WEST NYACK Rockland Center for the Arts “Kate Gilmore: Standing Here.” Through Dec. 5. “On Earth,” group show and “Lothar Osterburg: Piranesi.” Through Dec. 12. Mondays through Fridays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays and Sundays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Rockland Center for the Arts, 27 South Greenbush Road. rocklandartcenter.org; (845) 358-0877.

WHITE PLAINS Arts Exchange “Latin American Paper Arts Exhibition.” Through Dec. 5. Tuesdays through Saturdays, noon to 5 p.m. Arts Exchange, 31 Mamaroneck Avenue. westarts.com; (914) 428-4220.

WOODSTOCK Galerie BMG “Florilegium,” works by Kim Kauffman. Through Nov. 29. Alyson Belcher, photographs. Dec. 3 through Jan. 10. Fridays through Mondays, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., or by appointment. Galerie BMG, 12 Tannery Brook Road. galeriebmg.com; (845) 679-0027.

YONKERS Hudson River Museum “Paintbox Leaves: Autumnal Inspiration from Cole to Wyeth,” group show. Through Jan. 16. $3 to $5; members, free. Wednesdays through Sundays, noon to 5 p.m. Hudson River Museum, 511 Warburton Avenue. (914) 963-4550; hrm.org.

Music and Dance

BEDFORD Bedford Presbyterian Church “A Candelight Christmas Concert,” presented by the Charis Chamber Voices. Dec. 5 at 4 p.m. $20 and $25. Bedford Presbyterian Church, Village Green. (914) 931-6575; charisvocals.com.

BRONXVILLE Reisinger Concert Hall, Sarah Lawrence College “Composer Portrait: William Schuman at 100: A Sarah Lawrence Legend: 1935-1945,” concerts, lectures and films. Dec. 1 at 7 p.m. Free. Reisinger Concert Hall, Sarah Lawrence College, 1 Mead Way. slc.edu/campuscalendar; (914) 395-2412.

DOBBS FERRY South Presbyterian Church “A Rose in Winter,” presented by the Angelica chamber singers. Dec. 4 at 7:30 p.m. $8 and $15. South Presbyterian Church, 343 Broadway. angelicavoices.org; (914) 478-3267.

IRVINGTON Irvington Town Hall Theater Rat Race Choir, progressive rock. Nov. 27 at 8 p.m. $28. Judy Collins, folk. Dec. 3 at 8 p.m. $55 to $100. Irvington Town Hall Theater, 85 Main Street. irvingtontheater.com; (914) 591-6602.

IRVINGTON-ON-HUDSON Irvington Public Library “Five American Women Composers,” featuring Margaret Mills, piano. Nov. 21 at 4 p.m. Free. Irvington Public Library, 12 South Astor Street. (914) 591-7840; irvingtonlibrary.org.

KATONAH Caramoor Jasper String Quartet, classical. Nov. 21 at 4 p.m. $25. Caramoor, 149 Girdle Ridge Road. (914) 232-1252; caramoor.com.

KINGSTON Ulster Performing Arts Center “A Christmas Carol,” presented by the Ulster Ballet Company. Dec. 3 through Dec. 5. $10 to $15. Ulster Performing Arts Center, 601 Broadway. (845) 339-6088; upac.org.

LARCHMONT Watercolor Cafe Erin McKeown, pop. Dec. 1 at 8 p.m. $20. Karla Bonoff, pop. Dec. 5 at 7 p.m. $45. Watercolor Cafe, 2094 Boston Post Road. (914) 834-2213; watercolorcafe.net.

MAMARONECK Emelin Theater Beatlemania Now, tribute to the Beatles. Dec. 4 at 8 p.m. $55. David Bromberg Quartet, folk. Dec. 5 at 8 p.m. $60. Emelin Theater, 153 Library Lane. (914) 698-0098; emelin.org.

MARLBORO The Falcon Winard Harper, jazz. Nov. 27 at 7 p.m. Marvin Bugalu Smith, jazz. Dec. 2 at 7 p.m. Bruce Katz, blues. Dec. 3 at 7 p.m. Donations are accepted for each. The Falcon, 1348 Route 9W. (845) 236-7970; liveatthefalcon.com.

MOUNT KISCO Merestead “Heaven, Hell and Hollywood,” works by Erich Wolfgang Korngold, Miklos Rosza and others. Dec. 5 at 3 p.m. $10 to $25. Merestead, 455 Byram Lake Road. (914) 788-4659; coplandhouse.org.

MOUNT KISCO Presbyterian Church of Mount Kisco “Messiah,” by Handel, presented by the Westchester Oratorio Society. Nov. 21 at 4 p.m. $25. Presbyterian Church of Mount Kisco, 605 Millwood Road. (914) 763-9389; westchesteroratorio.org.

MOUNT VERNON St. Paul’s Church National Historic Site Jazz Quartet performance from the Music Conservatory at Purchase. Wednesday at 1 p.m. Free. St. Paul’s Church National Historic Site, 897 South Columbus Avenue. (914) 667-4116; nps.gov/sapa.

NEW ROCHELLE Ossie Davis Theater Fred Moyer, piano. Nov. 21 at 3 p.m. $2 suggested donation. Ossie Davis Theater, 1 Library Plaza. (914) 632-7878; nrpl.org.

OSSINING First Presbyterian Church of Ossining Collegium Westchester Chorus and Orchestra, classical. Nov. 21 at 8 p.m. Free. First Presbyterian Church of Ossining, 34 South Highland Avenue. presossining.org; (914) 941-0540.

OSSINING Ossining High School Old Mill Singers Holiday Concert. Dec. 3 and 4 at 8 p.m. $5 to $15. Ossining High School, 29 South Highland Avenue. (914) 762-3765; oldmillsingers.org.

PEEKSKILL Paramount Center for the Arts “Swing in the Holidays,” big band, featuring Michael Feinstein. Nov. 27 at 8 p.m. $38 to $58. Paramount Center for the Arts, 1008 Brown Street. paramountcenter.org; (914) 739-2333.

PELHAM Pelham Art Center “Korean Folk Art Day,” traditional music and dance. Dec. 4 at 11 a.m. “Diwali: Hindu Festival of Lights,” performances and activities. Dec. 5 at 1:30 p.m. Both are free. Pelham Art Center, 155 Fifth Avenue. (914) 738-2525; pelhamartcenter.org.

PIERMONT The Turning Point Dan Hicks and His Hot Licks, blues. Nov. 28 at 7:30 p.m. $40. Chris Smither, folk. Dec. 2 at 8 p.m. $30. Shemekia Copeland, blues. Dec. 3 at 9 p.m. $40. Enter the Haggis, Celtic rock. Dec. 5 at 4 p.m. $20. Bucky Pizzarelli featuring Ed Laub, jazz. Dec. 5 at 7:30 p.m. $20. The Turning Point, 468 Piermont Avenue. (845) 359-1089; turningpointcafe.com.

POUGHKEEPSIE Bardavon Opera House Amos Lee, funk and soul. Dec. 5 at 7 p.m. $28 and $33. Bardavon Opera House, 35 Market Street. (845) 473-2072; bardavon.org.

PURCHASE Performing Arts Center Orion String Quartet, classical. Dec. 5 at 3 p.m. $52.50. Performing Arts Center, 735 Anderson Hill Road. artscenter.org; (914) 251-6200.

RYE Rye Country Day School Attacca String Quartet, classical. Dec. 5 at 3:30 p.m. $25 suggested donation. Rye Country Day School, 1 Cedar Street. (914) 424-9547; musicforparkinsonsresearch.org.

SAUGERTIES Saugerties Pro Musica, Saugerties United Methodist Church Wei Zhou, piano and David Nagy, bassoon. Nov. 28 at 3 p.m. $10 and $12; students, free. Saugerties Pro Musica, Saugerties United Methodist Church, Washington Avenue and Post Street. (845) 246-5021; saugertiespromusica.org.

TARRYTOWN Tarrytown Music Hall “Side By Side,” with Shelby Lynne and Allison Moorer. Nov. 27 at 8 p.m. $32 to $60. Dave Brubeck Quartet, jazz. Dec. 3 at 8 p.m. $45 to $85. Rickie Lee Jones, rock. Dec. 5 at 8 p.m. $45 to $75. Tarrytown Music Hall, 13 Main Street. (877) 840-0457; tarrytownmusichall.org.

VALHALLA Academic Arts Theater “Tomaseen Foley’s a Celtic Christmas,” Irish music, dance and storytelling. Dec. 4 at 8 p.m. $18 and $20. Academic Arts Theater, 75 Grasslands Road. (914) 606-6262; sunywcc.edu.

WHITE PLAINS Music Conservatory of Westchester “Holiday Jazz,” featuring Hiroshi Yamazaki, piano, Rale Micic, guitar, Nick Mangini, drums and Steve LaSpina, bass. Dec. 3 at 7 p.m. $10 and $15. Music Conservatory of Westchester, 216 Central Avenue. musicconservatory.org; (914) 761-3900.

WOODSTOCK Bearsville Theater The Marc Black Band and the Amy Fradon Band, folk. Dec. 4 at 8:30 p.m. $20. Bearsville Theater, 291 Tinker Street. (845) 679-4406; bearsvilletheater.com.

Outdoors

OSSINING Teatown Lake Reservation “Ready, Set, Sleep,” learn how animals survive during the winter. Dec. 4 at 11 a.m. $5; members, free. Teatown Lake Reservation, 1600 Spring Valley Road. (914) 762-2912; teatown.org.

POUGHKEEPSIE Downtown Poughkeepsie “Celebration of Lights Parade and Fireworks.” Dec. 3 at 6:30 p.m. Free. Downtown Poughkeepsie, Main and Market Streets. (845) 473-5288; bardavon.org.

SCARSDALE Greenburgh Nature Center “Trim the Nature Tree,” decoration activities led by Dean Fausel. Dec. 5 at 1 p.m. $3 and $6. Greenburgh Nature Center, 99 Dromore Road. (914) 723-3470;

greenburghnaturecenter.org.

Spoken Word

KINGSTON Ulster Performing Arts Center Anthony Bourdain, lecture and discussion. Nov. 21 at 5 p.m. $40 to $100. Ulster Performing Arts Center, 601 Broadway. (845) 339-6088; upac.org.

MOUNT VERNON St. Paul’s Church National Historic Site “A Clash of Cultures: The Battle of the Little Bighorn,” lecture and discussion. Nov. 29 at 1 p.m. Free. St. Paul’s Church National Historic Site, 897 South Columbus Avenue. (914) 667-4116; nps.gov/sapa.

NORTH SALEM Hammond Museum and Japanese Stroll Garden “A Child’s Christmas in Wales,” by Dylan Thomas, reading by Alan Sklar. Dec. 4 at 4 p.m. Free. Hammond Museum and Japanese Stroll Garden, 28 Deveau Road. hammondmuseum.org; (914) 669-5033.

PEEKSKILL Antonia Arts and Studio Two “First Friday Open Mic,” poetry readings and music. Wine and cheese will be served. Dec. 3 at 8 p.m. $5. Antonia Arts and Studio Two , 814 South Street. (914) 930-7588; antoniaarts.com.

YONKERS Hudson River Museum “Science Sundays: The Scientist’s Eye, the Artist’s Touch,” discussion with Dorie Petrochko and Linda Thomas. Nov. 28 at 2:30 p.m. Free with museum admission. Wednesdays through Sundays, noon to 5 p.m. Hudson River Museum, 511 Warburton Avenue. (914) 963-4550; hrm.org.

Theater

ARMONK Whippoorwill Hall “It Happened One Christmas Eve,” musical by Bob Fitzsimmons and Barbara Campbell. Dec. 3 through Dec. 12. $14 and $18. Whippoorwill Hall, 19 Whippoorwill East. (914) 273-3887; armonkplayers.org.

BEDFORD HILLS Bedford Hills Community House “Gypsy,” musical by Jule Styne, Stephen Sondheim and Arthur Laurents. Through Nov. 21. $18. (914) 244-0474; bedfordcommunitytheatre.org. “Bill and Lois Wilson: In Their Own Words,” staged reading of letters and original stories. Nov. 27 at 7:30 p.m. $50. (914) 232-4822; steppingstones.org. Bedford Hills Community House, 74 Main Street.

ELMSFORD Westchester Broadway Theater “Jekyll and Hyde,” musical by Steve Cudon and Frank Wildhorn. Through Nov. 28 and Dec. 29 through Feb. 5. $62 to $75, dinner and show. “A Sleepy Hollow Christmas Carol,” musical by Jean-Paul Richard, based on the stories by Charles Dickens and Washington Irving. Dec. 1 through Dec. 26. $52 to $75. Westchester Broadway Theater, 75 Clearbrook Road. broadwaytheatre.com; (914) 592-2222.

IRVINGTON Irvington Town Hall Theater “The Drowsy Chaperone,” musical by Lisa Lambert, Greg Morrison, Bob Martin and Don McKellar. Presented by Broadway Training Center. Through Nov. 21. $14 and $20. Irvington Town Hall Theater, 85 Main Street. (914) 591-6602;

irvingtontheater.com.

PLEASANTVILLE Axial Theater at St. John’s Church “Welcome, This Is a Neighborhood Watch Community,” drama by Howard Meyer. Through Nov. 21. $15 and $20. Axial Theater at St. John’s Church, 8 Sunnyside Avenue. axialtheatre.org; (914) 962-8828.

PURCHASE Performing Arts Center, Purchase College “King John,” by Shakespeare. Dec. 3 through Dec. 11. $12.50 and $17.50. Performing Arts Center, Purchase College, 735 Anderson Hill Road. (914) 251-6200; artscenter.org.

SCARSDALE Edgemont High School Theater “And Then There Were None,” mystery by Agatha Christie, presented by the Greenville Community Theater. Dec. 1 through Dec. 4. $10 to $15. Edgemont High School Theater, 200 White Oak Lane. (914) 636-2863; gctstage.org.

VALHALLA Academic Arts Theater “Blood Type: Ragu,” one-man show by Frank Ingrasciotta. Dec. 5 at 3 p.m. $7 to $15. Academic Arts Theater, 75 Grasslands Road. (914) 606-6262; sunywcc.edu.

WHITE PLAINS White Plains Performing Arts Center “Wallenberg,” musical by Laurence Holzman, Felicia Needleman and Benjamin Rosenbluth. Through Nov. 21. $49. White Plains Performing Arts Center, 11 City Place. wppac.com; (914) 328-1600.

YORKTOWN HEIGHTS Yorktown Stage “Fiddler on the Roof,” musical by Jerry Bock, Sheldon Harnick and Joseph Stein. Through Nov. 28. $19 to $25. Yorktown Stage, 1974 Commerce Street. (914) 962-0606; yorktownstage.org.

If you want to more about living in Westchester County Call us at 914-500-9198 or email us to help you make the right choices.

And BTW, with these record low interest rates, there are amazing opportunities to own wonderful homes in Scarsdale, New Rochelle, Larchmont, Edgemont, Pelham, White Plains, Harrison, Mamaroneck, Hartsdale or any other Westchester towns., all for far less than Manhattan 1 and 2 bedroom apartments.

DebbieM@KW.com

DMFineHomes.com

914-500-9198

Share

Best Holiday Shows for Families in Westchester County, NY – December 2010

Best Holiday Shows for Families in Westchester County, NY – December 2010

by Julie Relevent November 15, 2010

FEATURED LISTINGS

RoboFun® Photos RoboFun®· Little scientists and engineers, Lego® fanatics and computer kids love our program! Children ages 6-14. Robotics with Lego®, Video Game Design, Claymation and Animation Camps.
RoboFun® Photos Fun 4 All· Fun 4 All! Long Island’s Indoor Fun Park, offers children and their families over 1/2 acre of fun, challenge, and adventure, All under one roof. Every visit to Fun 4 All! is a fun-filled journey that encourages children’s imagination to expand and grow.
RoboFun® Photos Not Just Art· Music, art & science enrichment for infants, toddlers, preschoolers, and elementary kids. Classes, holiday vacation and summer programs, parties, play dates, and a BEAUTIFUL creative toy store!

Find Great Weekend Activities – Click Here Related Articles

  • Where To Volunteer This Holiday Season: Soup Kitchens and More in Westchester County
  • Where to: Donate in NYC…Our Annual Donation Guide
  • Where To Volunteer This Holiday Season: Soup Kitchens and More in Suffolk County, Long Island
  • Check out our round-up of the best holiday shows and concerts for kids and families in Westchester County, New York.

    Westchester Ballet Company's production of "The Nutcracker"

    Westchester Ballet Company’s production of The Nutcracker

    It Happened One Christmas Eve is a heartwarming musical about an infant left on a Brooklyn doorstep one Christmas Eve and the magic she brings to the lives of those who find her. This show is filled with favorite Christmas carols and popular seasonal songs. Presented by the Armonk Players. December 3, 4, 10, 11 at 8pm; December 5 and 12 at 4pm; December 9 at 7:30pm. $18; $14 students. The North Castle Public Library, Whippoorwill Hall, 19 Whippoorwill Road East, Armonk. 914-273-3887. www.armonkplayers.org.

    Ajkun Ballet Theatre and children from the county will perform The Nutcracker, staged to Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky’s musical score and Marius Petipa’s choreography. December 3 at 7pm; December 4 at 2pm. $12. New Rochelle High School, Linda Kelly Theater, 265 Clove Road, New Rochelle. 212-868-4444. www.smarttix.com.

    See Frosty The Snowman, an annual musical for the entire family. Wish Frosty a happy 21st birthday when you meet him and his friends after the show. December 4 at 11am; December 5-8 at 10:30am. $14; $9 per person for group of 25 or more. Rochambeau Theater, 228 Fisher Avenue, White Plains. 914-761-7463. www.westcoproductions.org.

    Celebrate the holidays with festive selections from the American Songbook and original compositions by faculty performers at Holiday Jazz. December 3 at 7pm. $15; $10 students. Music Conservatory of Westchester, 216 Central Avenue, White Plains. 914-761-3900. www.musicconservatory.org.

    An original musical, The Adventures of the Christmas Elf, is about Eddie, who longs to prove that he is the North Pole’s number one Elf. December 10 at 7pm; December 11 at 1pm and 4pm; December 12 at 4pm. Call for prices. Actors Conservatory Theatre, 20 Buckingham Road, Yonkers. 914-391-6558. www.actshows2.org.

    The Songcatchers’ 16th Annual Concert For Peace features songs of peace and hope. December 12 at 4:30pm. FREE; donations suggested. College of New Rochelle, Holy Family Chapel, 29 Castle Place, New Rochelle. 914-654-1178. www.songcatchers.org.

    Westchester Ballet Company’s production of The Nutcracker includes classic choreography and special stage effects. Featuring American Ballet Theatre’s Mikhail Ilyin as the Cavalier and Renata Pavam as the Sugar Plum Fairy, and pre-professional dancers from the area. December 17 at 10am; December 18 at 12:30pm and 4:30pm; and December 19 at 2pm. Advance tickets $18; $12 ages 2-10; $22 all tickets day of the performance. Westchester County Center, 198 Central Avenue, White Plains. 845-454-3388. www.ticketmaster.com.

    If you want to more about living in Westchester County Call us at 914-500-9198 or email us to help you make the right choices.

    And BTW, with these record low interest rates, there are amazing opportunities to own wonderful homes in Scarsdale, New Rochelle, Larchmont, Edgemont, Pelham, White Plains, Harrison, Mamaroneck, Hartsdale or any other Westchester towns., all for far less than Manhattan 1 and 2 bedroom apartments.

    DebbieM@KW.com

    DMFineHomes.com

    914-500-9198

    Share

    Now is the Best Time to Buy a Home and to Sell One in Westchester

    Best Time to Buy AND Best Time to Sell?

    As real estate professionals, we sometimes get inquisitive looks, as we may be telling a friend that this is a great time to buy a home and another friend that they have to lower their price in order to sell their home. Wait a minute. How can it be a great time to buy if prices are falling? Are we just saying this to make a sale? Actually, the Realtors are correct on both counts. Perhaps for the first time in American real estate history, you must buy now and you must sell now. How can this be? Because what is important to the buyer is different than what is important to the seller. Let us explain.

    The most important thing to the seller: PRICE

    Every seller is most concerned with trying to get the best price possible for their home. In order to do that, they must sell now. Banks repossessed the highest number of foreclosed homes in history last month. These houses will come to market at dramatically discounted prices. This is the main reason analysts are calling for another dip in prices over the next eighteen months. The best advice a seller can receive is to sell their home now before these foreclosures come to market.

    The most important thing to the buyer: COST

    Price plays a part in the buyer’s decision. However, the most important thing to most buyers is the cost – the mortgage payment they must pay every month. That payment is determined by the price of the home AND THE INTEREST RATE ON THE MORTGAGE. Rates are artificial low because of government intervention. That will not last forever.

    The National Association of Realtors (NAR) has projected that rates will rise over the next seven quarters. What will that do to the cost? Here are NAR’s projections and what impact it will have on a $100,000 mortgage:

    interest rate impact

    For a million dollar mortgage, you can multiply that difference by 10. $82 becomes $820 a month or nearly $10,000 a years for 30 years: $300,000. As we can see, the interest rate has a major impact on the COST of the home. Even if prices continue to fall, the cost of the home may not go down if interest rates increase; the cost to own the home may even go up.

    Bottom Line

    The Quantative Easing by the Federal Reserve has become a reality and mortgage rates have already ticked upwards this week, so right now is the best time to either buy or sell.  Your real estate agent is trying to give the best advice they can to every family they work with – even if that advice seems to be counter intuitive. Call us at 914-500-9198 or email us to help you make the right choices.

    With these record low interest rates, there are amazing opportunities to own wonderful homes in Scarsdale, New Rochelle, Larchmont, Edgemont, Pelham, White Plains, Harrison, Mamaroneck, Hartsdale or any other Westchester towns., all for less than a Manhattan 1 bedroom apartment.

    DebbieM@KW.com

    DMFineHomes.com

    914-500-9198

    Share

    What Does a Foreclosure in Your Neighborhood Mean for You?

    What impact does a vacant foreclosure have on a neighborhood?

    Most people (especially in Westchester) think the effects of the bank freeze on foreclosures won’t effect them much unless they are personally trying to buy or sell a foreclosed property, but they are wrong.

    scarsdale foreclosures for saleAs you can see in this map of Scarsdale NY, there are plenty of foreclosures (79) and preforeclosures even in the most affluent neighborhoods.

    1) Vacant foreclosed homes have deferred maintenance which makes them readily noticeable (eyesores). That leads to a whole plethora of challenges for the neighbors. Pests move in and, in many cases, so does crime.

    Studies have shown that just one vacant foreclosure in a neighborhood can cost the other homes 1% in value.

    2) Some serious buyers may choose to wait and purchase one of them rather than your home, or at least use the distressed price as a bargaining chip when valuing your home.

    The Center for Responsible Lending has done great research on this issue. In my state of New York, foreclosures will cost innocent, near-by homeowners an average of $37,649 over the next few years. Let’s say you live in Scarsdale or one of our other affluent areas, it’s costing you over $150,000.  Go here to find out the numbers state by state. And these numbers don’t reflect your weaker bargaining position.

    So, yes, foreclosures reflect all of us, regardless, whether you made all your mortgage payments on time. Call us at 914-500-9198 or email us if you want help buying or selling a short sale property and just want to buy or sell your home for the best possible price.

    With these record low interest rates, now is the time to sell your homes in Scarsdale, New Rochelle, Larchmont, Edgemont, Pelham, White Plains, Harrison, Mamaroneck, Hartsdale, Rye or any other Westchester towns.

    For more information contact us at DebbieM@KW.com

    DMFineHomes.com

    914-500-9198

    Share

    5 Good Reasons You Should Sell Your House TODAY!

    5 Reasons You Should Sell Your House TODAY!

    KCM

    Selling your house in today’s market can be extremely difficult. It is for that reason that every seller should take advantage of each and every opportunity that appears. Each fall, such an opportunity presents itself. This fall, that opportunity may be just too good to pass up.

    Below are five reasons you should consider pricing your house to sell in the next 90 days. Meet with your real estate agent and mortgage professional today and see whether it is the right move for you and your family.

    1. Entering this time of year, the buyers are more serious.

    We all realize that buyers are not quick to pull the trigger on the purchase of a home today. There is no sense of urgency with the supply of eligible properties at all time highs. However, at this time of year, the ‘lookers’ are at the stores doing their holiday shopping. The home buyers left in the market are serious and are more apt to make a purchasing decision. Less showings – but to more motivated purchasers.

    2. If you are moving up, you can save thousands.

    The Chicago Tribune stated in an article last week that sellers who want to ‘trade up’ should act now:

    It could be a bigger house, different neighborhood or a better school district, but it comes with a higher price tag. Do the math; this might be the right time.

    A home that was once worth $300,000 may now be worth $240,000 in a market where prices have fallen 20 percent. Wow, you think, the seller is taking a bath. But that seller may also be a prospective buyer who wants a house that once was valued at $400,000. With an equivalent market drop and a realistic listing price, that house may now sell for $320,000. So, in effect, the person is losing $60,000 on the sale of one home but coming out ahead $20,000 on the purchase of another.

    Keep in mind the spread may be even greater. There’s a smaller pool of potential buyers for more expensive homes, so sellers may be more willing to cut their price to get a deal done.

    3. Interest rates just fell again – to 4.19%.

    Professor Karl E. Case, the founder of the Case Shiller Pricing Index in an article in the New York Times last month actually did the math for us:

    Four years ago, the monthly payment on a $300,000 house with 20 percent down and a mortgage rate of about 6.6 percent was $1,533. Today that $300,000 house would sell for $213,000 and a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage with 20 percent down would carry a rate of about 4.2 percent and a monthly payment of $833 … housing has perhaps never been a better bargain.

    4. You beat the rush of inventory that is coming next year.

    Every year there is an increase of inventory which comes to market from January through April as homeowners put their houses up for sale in preparation for the spring market. As an example, here is the number of listings available for sale in each of those months in 2010.

    • January – 3,277,000
    • February – 3,531,000
    • March – 3,626,000
    • April – 4,029,000

    You won’t have to worry about this increasing competition if you sell now.

    5. You have less ‘discounted’ inventory with which to compete.

    This year, sellers of non-distressed properties have been given an early holiday present. With banks declaring a suspension on the sale of many distressed properties (foreclosures), there has been a large supply of discounted properties removed from competition. No one knows how long this self imposed moratorium will last. However, while it does, every homeowner has a better chance of selling their property.

    Bottom Line

    If you are looking to sell in the near future, there may not be a more opportune time than this fall. Serious buyers, great move-up deals and less competition from foreclosures creates the perfect selling situation. Don’t miss it!

    With these record low interest rates and great market conditions, there are amazing opportunities to own wonderful homes in in Scarsdale, New Rochelle, Larchmont, Edgemont, Pelham, White Plains, Harrison, Mamaroneck, Hartsdale, Rye or any other Westchester towns., all for less than a Manhattan 1 bedroom apartment.

    For more information contact us at DebbieM@KW.com

    DMFineHomes.com

    914-500-9198

    Share

    How to Pay Less for Your Home Mortgage; The Banks Have Wiggle Room.

    From the Wall Street Journal

    Mortgages: How to Pay Less

    A Wave of Consolidation Is Forcing Smaller Banks to Offer Better Terms Than Ever

    By JESSICA SILVER-GREENBERG

    The interest rates for 30-year fixed-rate mortgages are in free fall, averaging just 4.44% on Aug. 12, according to Freddie Mac. Not only was that down from 5.07% in January, it was the lowest since Freddie began keeping records in 1970.

    But even better deals can be found at smaller banks and credit unions.

    “I’ve found that my clients can get routinely better rates by heading to a more regional lender and forgoing the bigger lenders,” says Sean Satkus, a real-estate agent in the Washington, D.C., area.

    The differences can be stark. On average, the three biggest banks—Bank of America Corp., Wells Fargo & Co. and J.P. Morgan Chase & Co.—offer rates of 4.66% on 30-year fixed mortgages for home purchases, according to Bankrate.com. By contrast, St. Louis’s Heartland Bank is offering a rate of 4.50%. Acacia Federal Savings Bank comes in at 4.25%. And Rockland Trust Co. in Boston is offering just 4.13%. (None of these offers include “points,” or extra fees to secure lower rates.)

    [MORTGAGE] Jason Schneider

    To some extent smaller banks have always been a little more competitive on rates. But “the discrepancy is widening,” says Guy Cecala, publisher of Inside Mortgage Finance, an industry newsletter, “and I only expect it to get wider in the future.”

    Consolidation during and after the financial crisis is the biggest factor. Together, Wells Fargo, BofA and Chase accounted for 56.5% of new mortgage originations in the first half of this year, according to Inside Mortgage Finance—up from just 36.6% in 2007.

    Now these banks don’t have to compete on pricing in the same way, Mr. Cecala says: “They have a large share of the market, and aren’t worried about demand.”

    Pricing Advantages

    Smaller mortgage brokers and regional banks also have some built-in pricing advantages, says Greg McBride, a senior financial analyst at Bankrate.com. They are nimbler than larger competitors, he says, and can cut overhead when they need to—making them lean enough to price loans aggressively.

    Compensation structures for loan officers are also a factor. Smaller lenders tend to pay on commission, “and will sometimes operate on thinner margins to get higher volumes of loans out,” Mr. McBride says. “Mortgage brokers tend to live or die on volume.” By contrast, big banks tend to pay loan officers a salary regardless of volume. In fact, it often is cheaper for big banks simply to buy loans originated by smaller banks, or “correspondent lenders,” than to reduce rates to compete with them.

    “The bigger banks can save money on origination by buying the loans from correspondent lenders later in the chain,” Mr. McBride says.

    Profit margins are falling sharply at smaller firms. According to a July 20 study by the Mortgage Bankers Association, profits per origination at independent mortgage lenders were down to $606 during the first quarter of 2010 from $1,088 in the same quarter last year.

    Room to Fall

    Yet there still may be room to fall, says Cameron Findlay, chief economist of LendingTree, an online lender. On Aug. 1, he says, the average rate for 30-year fixed-rate mortgages was 4.56%, which was more than one percentage point greater than the average of 3.45% at which lenders could sell these loans to investors in the secondary market. “There’s clearly more wiggle room there,”he says.

    [If you've got good credit, press the banks and/or your mortgage broker to get you a better rate.]

    Borrowers looking for smaller lenders or brokers can trawl websites like Lendingtree and Bankrate.com, which lists rates in local regions.

    Alex Sorokin is taking advantage of small banks’ largess. The 52-year old accountant wanted to buy a two-bedroom condominium in Brooklyn, N.Y., and initially thought he would get the best rate from Chase, Commerce Bank or Wachovia, now part of Wells Fargo.

    When he started inquiring in April, he says, he was surprised to find that none would offer a rate for a $279,000 mortgage lower than 4.8%. That is when he decided to contact Luxury Mortgage, a Connecticut-based lender. He ended up with a rate of 4.625%.

    “We closed in July,” Mr. Sorokin says, “and I am really happy.”

    With these record low interest rates, there are amazing opportunities to own wonderful homes in in Scarsdale, New Rochelle, Larchmont, Edgemont, Pelham, White Plains, Harrison, Mamaroneck, Hartsdale or any other Westchester towns., all for less than a Manhattan 1 bedroom apartment.

    DebbieM@KW.com

    DMFineHomes.com

    914-500-9198

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